The Gross National Debt

Tuesday, January 31, 2012

We don't dial 911

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Some time back the State of Florida decided exotic snakes, mostly of the constrictor variety, were a problem. With typical state thinking and invoking the Power Of Idiocy, state officials said was OK to hunt the snakes ... during gator season.
Lunch is served in S. Florida.

Hah? There is a problem with an invasive species and the state limits the public's ability to eliminate them to a few weeks a year?

Here in the Peach State, we have a slightly different policy on "exotic" critters. Kill 'em all. Kill 'em however and whenever you want.

But in the State of Retirement, especially down in the Everglades, the snakes are getting really out of hand.

In other words "Nearly all the raccoons, possums, deer and bobcats gone."
The ultimate empiricists.

Now lemme interject here - I am not a fan of any state or federal biologist program. Part of this is a requirement of working for taxpayer dollars. They are not just not allowed to say things that massively contradict official sanctioned wildlife policy. Furthermore, the biologists live in their own little insular world; anything that doesn't fit their notions must be rejected. I've had run-ins with biologists over the years over things like turtles, bears and eagles - all of which I have seen and seen repeatedly in places they are not supposed to exist according to the biologists.

Black panthers are another matter entirely. I ain't saying you've never seen one, but every one which has been pointed out to me was a feral (or non feral) dog.
Bit off more'n he could chew.

Anyway, S. Florida is starting to run short on small to mid-sized mammals. Snakes are being blamed.

The government has again stepped in. "The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has been watching the python explosion and is taking action. On Jan. 17, the agency made it illegal to import Burmese pythons or transport them across state lines. That includes three other constrictor species from Africa and South America: the yellow anaconda and the northern and southern African pythons."

 To much, too little, too late. The snakes are here to stay.
This man is now running for office.

So what can be done? Enter the government.

At Mom's house not long ago I learned in utter amazement as a county in S. Florida actually has a Public Safety branch exclusively aimed at removal and handling of animals, specifically snakes and gators. A lot of people employed by this department.

Uh what?

These officers corral said offending reptiles and haul them off to other places in the Glades in the case of gators or to a secure facility in the case of snakes where the critters can live out the rest of their life.

Uh what?

Anyone other than me wondering what anaconda tastes like? Seriously.
Betcha

When snakes show up around my place, I don't dial 911. I decide if the snake is big enough to eat or not. If not big enough (and not an exotic snake), I relocate it to the woods well away from people. If it's big enough to be skinned out and fried, well now, I have just acquired lunch.

If S. Florida is seriously interested in getting rid of the exotic snakes, they'll encourage people to treat the snakes like I do armadillos.

Kill 'em all. To death and then some.

Yup.

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