The Gross National Debt

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

G'head. Make My Day - Part II

The problem with opinion is everyone can have one. The BIG problem with opinion is that it can become law when someone (or a group of people) who is strong enough decides to force his opinion on others.

You may disagree. Then you tell me what a law is.

What about things that are offensive which are government-sponsored and government-endorsed? Do we ban those?

“Yeah. Government has no business supporting anything that’s offensive.”

What about government opinions? Should government be allowed to have an opinion? What if that opinion is offensive? What do we do then?

“Government doesn’t have opinions.”

Ever heard of the U.S. Supreme Court? It’s rulings are always called opinions.

“Talking about law, Baker.”

SCOTUS rulings are law. If they weren’t we’d still have segregated schools. SCOTUS has overturned voter-approved term limits.

“…”

Furthermore, any government law is an opinion anyway.

“No, it’s not.”

Yes it is. A law is nothing more than an opinion of the ruler (this can be a group of people) which can be enforced by that ruler. Law is nothing more than the strongest person’s (or group’s) opinion backed with enough lethal force to eliminate anyone who disagrees.

“No, it’s not.”

Then you explain it. What is a law?

As I just said, a law is nothing more than an opinion, backed up by sufficient force to make people adhere to the opinion. Without that force, the law is only an opinion and has no weight. The ability to force others to abide by that opinion is what makes it a law.

Might makes right, in other words. Speed limits are an opinion. A government opinion that says “this is as fast as you should go.” Break that law and get caught and government applies force. It takes your money and your liberty against your will. You can argue your opinion in court. Might makes right. Capital punishment is the ultimate expression of opinion in society. Putting someone to death is saying “You are a bad person and do not deserve to live.”

“You’re wrong.”


Then please, explain it to me. 

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