The Gross National Debt

Tuesday, May 10, 2016

Parse, parse, parse

parse
pärs/
verb
  1. 1.
    analyze (a sentence) into its parts and describe their syntactic roles.
noun
COMPUTING
  1. 1.
    an act of or the result obtained by parsing a string or a text.

Parse. In Southern, it means to understand what is being said. In S.F. it falls short of grok, but gets you pointed in the right direction. 

As my High School economics teacher Donna Robison taught me, you gotta look for the complete comparison. She told us "Better than" is a semantically null statement. "Better than what?" she told us to ask.

Good journalists, those who are responsible and are not intentionally spinning an agenda, make parsing simple. Those with an agenda to push making parsing hard to impossible depending on how hard they put their nose to the grindstone. The good ones tell you it is better than a poke in the eye with a sharp stick, or something else. The bad ones just say it's better.

So, crost my email this morning comes this great example.

"TAMPA, Fla. (May 10, 2016) – Fatal crashes involving drivers who recently used marijuana doubled in Washington after the state legalized the drug, according to the latest research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. New research also shows that legal limits for marijuana and driving are arbitrary and unsupported by science, which could result in unsafe motorists going free and others being wrongfully convicted for impaired driving."

Wow. Doubled. Impressive!

Read down a few more 'graphs.

" • The percentage of drivers involved in fatal crashes who recently used marijuana more than doubled from eight to 17 percent between 2013 and 2014."

You have more information now. Instead of one fatality and then two fatalities (doubled). Still pretty a freekin' hefty increase, but more manageable. Still don't know the exact number of fatalities. Parse, baby parse.

Back this train up. We're not done!

"...legal limits for marijuana and driving are arbitrary and unsupported by science..." 

Hrm. Arbitrary. Yanno what else is arbitrary? Blood alcohol content, BAC. The legal limit for DUI is .08. In other worlds (that is not a typo), if your blood is .08 percent alcohol and you get behind the wheel to drive, you are DUI. Arbitrary. I know people who at .10 BAC are better drivers than some people who've never had a drink in their entire life. I know some people who can't walk at .07 BAC.

Further this article states:

"Current science shows that drivers do not reliably become impaired at a specific level of marijuana in the blood. Depending on the individual, drivers with low levels of THC in their blood may be unsafe behind the wheel, while others with relatively high levels might not be impaired. This finding is very different from alcohol, where it is clear that crash risk increases significantly at higher BAC levels."

Arbitrary is explained, but ya have to read down into the article to figure that out. Parse baby parse.

Here's another buttocks prodder, "Twelve states have strict per se laws that forbid the presence of any levels of marijuana."

None. Zip. Zilch. Nada. Anyone else see the problem with this?

I give you a f'r'instance. I have never partaken of weed, but I have been around people who did. I've also gone on raids with L.E. and handled the harvest. In one raid, an officer told us that we would not pass a drug test for a few days post-raid. He'd give us a letter clearing us if we had such a test. And yet in those 12 states, we'd all be charged with DUI marijuana.

Parse baby parse.

For those still wimme, the whole press release is below. I deleted the contact info cause that's not sposed to be released to the public.


AAA: Marijuana Users in Fatal Crashes Doubles After Legalization

Garrett T......
To
wiregrassfarmer@
Today at 12:05 AM

 NEWS RELEASE
   CONTACT:
 Garrett Townsend, GA Public Affairs Director, AAA - The Auto Club Group,
  cell: (404) XXX-XXX, GTownsend@....... 

AAA: FATAL ROAD CRASHES INVOLVING MARIJUANA DOUBLE AFTER STATE LEGALIZES DRUG
New AAA Foundation Research Also Shows that Legal Limits for ‘Marijuana and Driving’ are Meaningless
 
Videos:
Dash Cam Video/B-Roll - Drivers allegedly impaired by marijuana
Sound Bites - AAA Spokesman, Matt Nasworthy

TAMPA, Fla. (May 10, 2016) – Fatal crashes involving drivers who recently used marijuana doubled in Washington after the state legalized the drug, according to the latest research by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. New research also shows that legal limits for marijuana and driving are arbitrary and unsupported by science, which could result in unsafe motorists going free and others being wrongfully convicted for impaired driving.
Washington was one of the first two states to legalize the recreational use of marijuana, and these findings raise serious concerns about drug-impaired driving with at least 20 states considering marijuana legalization this year.
“AAA does not take a position on the legalization of marijuana, but is passionate about laws ensuring the safety of the motoring public,” said Kevin Bakewell, Senior Vice President and Chief Public Affairs Officer for AAA – The Auto Club Group. “Given the findings of this new research, our advice is that nobody should drive after recent marijuana use, and law enforcement should have a fair and educated approach for dealing with those who do.”
The Foundation examined drug tests and fatal crashes among drivers in Washington, a state that legalized marijuana in December 2012. The researchers found:
The percentage of drivers involved in fatal crashes who recently used marijuana more than doubled from eight to 17 percent between 2013 and 2014.
One in six drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2014 had recently used marijuana, which is the most recent data available.
“The significant increase in fatal crashes with marijuana present is definitely a cause for concern,” said Matt Nasworthy, Traffic Safety Consultant for AAA – The Auto Club Group. “These findings make it all the more critical that we continue to research ways to enforce impaired driving scientifically, not simply by using an arbitrary number.”
In an attempt to enforce drug-impaired driving, some states have created legal limits, also known as per se limits, which specify the maximum amount of active THC that drivers can have in their system based on a blood test. THC is the main chemical component in marijuana that can impair driver performance and affect the mind, and the presence of active THC is generally suggestive of recent marijuana use. These limits are similar in concept to the .08 BAC limit for driving under the influence of alcohol.
Researchers examined the lab results of drivers arrested for impaired driving, and the results suggest that legal limits for marijuana and driving are problematic because:
Current science shows that drivers do not reliably become impaired at a specific level of marijuana in the blood. Depending on the individual, drivers with low levels of THC in their blood may be unsafe behind the wheel, while others with relatively high levels might not be impaired. This finding is very different from alcohol, where it is clear that crash risk increases significantly at higher BAC levels.
High THC levels may drop below legal thresholds before a test is administered to a suspected impaired driver. The average time to collect blood from a suspected driver is often more than two hours because taking a blood sample typically requires a warrant and transport to a facility. Active THC blood levels may decline significantly and could drop below legal limits during that time.
Marijuana can affect people differently, making it challenging to develop consistent and fair guidelines. For example, frequent users of marijuana can exhibit persistent levels of the drug long after use, while drug levels can decline more rapidly among occasional users. 
“There is understandably a strong desire by both lawmakers and the public to create legal limits for marijuana impairment, in the same manner as we do with alcohol,” said Bakewell. “In the case of marijuana, this approach is flawed and not supported by scientific research. It’s simply not possible today to determine whether a driver is impaired based solely on the amount of the drug in their body.”
AAA urges states to use more comprehensive enforcement measures to improve road safety. Rather than relying on arbitrary legal limits, states should use a two-component system that requires (1) a positive test for recent marijuana use, and most importantly, (2) behavioral and physiological evidence of driver impairment. This system would rely heavily on two current law-enforcement training programs: Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement (ARIDE) and the 50-state Drug Evaluation and Classification (DEC) program. These programs train law enforcement officers around the country to more effectively recognize drug-impaired driving.  
“Marijuana can affect driver safety by impairing vehicle control and judgement,” continued Nasworthy. “Just because a drug is legal does not mean it is safe to use while operating a motor vehicle. Drivers who get behind the wheel while impaired put themselves and others on the road at risk.”
Four states, including Alaska, Colorado, Oregon, Washington and Washington, D.C., have legalized the recreational use of marijuana, and 20 states have legalized it for therapeutic and medicinal use. Montana and Washington have implemented a per se limit for marijuana at 5 ng/mL; Nevada and Ohio have set a limit at 2 ng/mL; and Pennsylvania’s is set at 1 ng/mL (view a map). Twelve states have strict per se laws that forbid the presence of any levels of marijuana. In Colorado, a blood concentration of 5 ng/mL or more gives rise to permissible inference that a person was driving under the influence of the drug.
The AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety will release additional studies later this year that will focus more on marijuana impaired driving and the data collected.
About The Auto Club Group
The Auto Club Group (ACG) is the second largest AAA club in North America.  ACG and its affiliates provide membership, travel, insurance and financial services offerings to over 9 million members across eleven states and two U.S. territories including Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, Nebraska, North Dakota, Tennessee, Wisconsin, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands; most of Illinois and Minnesota; and a portion of Indiana.  ACG belongs to the national AAA federation with more than 55 million members in the United States and Canada and whose mission includes protecting and advancing freedom of mobility and improving traffic safety.
About the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety
Established by AAA in 1947, the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit, publicly supported charitable research and educational organization. Dedicated to saving lives and reducing injuries on our roads, the Foundation’s mission is to prevent crashes and save lives through research and education about traffic safety. The Foundation has funded over 300 research projects designed to discover the causes of traffic crashes, prevent them and minimize injuries when they do occur.  Visit www.AAAFoundation.org for more information on this and other research. 


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