The Gross National Debt

Monday, January 5, 2015

Change - hopefully for the better

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At prison Sunday night, we talked about change. A new year is a time people traditionally look to for change.

Part of the sermon was how 2014 saw changes in me; I hope they are for the better. I changed because I wanted to.

The first actually began a few years ago when I reconnected with college buddies and connected with a few other folks. Years behind all of us and the wisdom life beats into us has modified us all to some degree. These people who are near and dear to me forced me to change; again 'cause I wanted to. The change they brought about became obvious to me over this past year.

Rather than just spit out whatever I thought and present it as A Law Of The Universe, they challenged me to back it up OR say it's just my opinion and applies to me. This has carried forward into more of my life and I like it, a lot. It's not permeated everything, but I want it to.

It may be good for me. It might not be good for you.

Change 2 was came through an NPR article (I think). Regardless, the article talked about dealing with and talking to people. The article said when engaging someone, do not ask what they will do. Rather, as HOW they will do it.

That simple change from WHAT to HOW resets their mind. Rather than back up into a defensive mode, people will generally shift gears and enter an education mode.

By asking "how" you are really asking for help. You ask for helping understanding their point of view.

They have to think.

Of course some people will object to thinking. Deal with them as you see fit.

Change 3 was as monumental to me as the above two. Tommy Clack is a Vietnam veteran missing his right shoulder and all of that arm and both legs above the knee. His left arm is intact. This'll get you started in learning about this truly amazing man.

He spoke this fall to the highs school students here. Mr. Clack, who nearly died in Vietnam, has been around the world, done more than I will ever accomplish, shook my hand after he was done speaking and said "What can I do to make it better?"

I hope my shock wasn't visible. This man asked me what he could do to make the speech better.

His simple remark changed me. I'm trying to look at everything I do now with an eye toward "What can I do to make it better?" With that in mind, lemme rephrase, "HOW can I make it better?"

So I ask you, my readers, how can it better and how can I contribute?

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